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Candace Bure on the far right as D.J. Tanner.

Candace Bure on the far right as D.J. Tanner.

I’m going to be controversial here.  You may not agree with me and you may not like me much after you read this.  Bear with me.

I like Candace Cameron Bure.  I really do.  I loved her as D.J. Tanner on “Full House”.  As a big sister myself, I understood where she was coming from. She’s shared her struggles with weight and self-esteem. In the past, I’ve enjoyed reading interviews about her.  She seems down-to-earth and real about her faith.

But this DWTS (Dancing with the Stars) modesty issue is ridiculous.  Modesty, it seems, is still a hot topic.

Why do Christians on TV  insist on talk, talk, talking about their faith?  Christians would be better at making a stand if they put on excellence in all they do  instead of pontificating. Wouldn’t it be more effective if she simply showed her faith by being loving, kind and a diligent dance partner?

If you’re a believer and you felt that strongly about your attire, why would you even participate in “Dancing with the Stars”?  Just for publicity?  If you want to continue to be modest in your roles as a wife and mother, why even attempt such a feat?   The cost of being an adult female working in Hollywood usually includes a heavy measure of sexy.  And dancing with another man who isn’t your husband, being flirty with him to convey a feeling or story through dance, his hands going, uh, wherever, comes across as modest behavior?

I think this is the scripture Cameron’s hanging her hat on:

And I want women to be modest in their appearance. They should wear decent and appropriate clothing and not draw attention to themselves by the way they fix their hair or by wearing gold or pearls or expensive clothes. – I Timothy 2:9

Frankly, it’s a rather vague scripture. Paul was trying to guide Gentile believers into a standard of Christian purity. These folks had no concept of how to live as Christians.  Bill Gothard has a portion of his ministry focused on this – “no dangly earrings” among many other clothing prohibitions.  According to this scriptural definition, though, only Pentecostal Holiness, Catholic nuns and the Amish model true modesty.  My husband argues nuns garner attention simply because of how they’re dressed.  They stand out a mile. Again, we find ourselves back to phrases such as “decent and appropriate clothing”…which means what? Who gets to be the arbiter of modesty?  Not me!

I’m going out on a limb here and say if you’re a person of faith, you have to earn the right to be heard.  Some of you may say Candace has paid her dues.  She’s been on TV and under the media microscope.  I agree.  Within reason.  But if you’re trying to “not draw attention to” yourself, this isn’t the way to do it.  The focus has become all about her and not about Christian modesty.

It seems Mrs. Bure glossed over this next part of the scripture, I Timothy 2:10:  For women who claim to be devoted to God should make themselves attractive by the good things they do.

Anyway, who decides who’s a role model?  Role models just *are*. The best ones don’t even mention it. They simply live their convictions. Isn’t that what it’s all about, in the end?  You will know them by their fruit.  Talking isn’t getting it done.  However, I’ve heard good reports of her on that front.  She genuinely does care about people.  I’m glad to hear it. But all the making a statement stuff detracts from the real issue of living for Christ.

 

 

 

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